Tenure for Kennedy

Congratulations to TagueTeamLab collaborator and friend Dr. Maureen Kennedy – Assistant Professor, University of Washington Tacoma, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Division of Sciences and Mathematics – on her newly granted tenure last month! Dr. Kennedy incorporated fire spread modeling into the RHESSys model = RHESSys-Fire.

David Miller’s Defense

David Miller presented his defense entitled “Remote Sensing of Urban Vegetation during Drought in Southern California” on December 4th.

New Book: Mountains in the Greenhouse

Longtime Tague Team Lab collaborator Don McKenzie just published a new book – a great, accessible, science book for the public introduction to the mountains we study and enjoy so much.

New Pub! Impacts of forest‐fuel treatments and wildfire on hydrologic fluxes in the Sierra Nevada

In this April Ecohydrology publication, “Fuels treatment and wildfire effects on runoff from Sierra Nevada mixed‐conifer forests” – RHESSys, constrained with spatially distributed field measurements, was used to assess the impacts of forest‐fuel treatments and wildfire on hydrologic fluxes in two Sierra Nevada firesheds.  Saksa, P.C., Bales, R.C., Tague, C.L., Battles, J.J., Tobin, B.W., Conklin, M.H. (2019)Continue reading “New Pub! Impacts of forest‐fuel treatments and wildfire on hydrologic fluxes in the Sierra Nevada”

New Pub! Vertical processes and the nitrate concentration–discharge relationships in a semi‐arid watershed

In this new publication “Sensitivity of nitrate concentration‐discharge patterns to soil nitrate distribution and drainage properties in the vertical dimension“, the authors argue that vertical ‘variable source area’ (VSA) processes may be as important as lateral VSA in determining concentration-discharge relationships in a semi‐arid watershed. Chen, X., Tague, C.L., Melack, J.M., Keller, A.A. (2020) SensitivityContinue reading “New Pub! Vertical processes and the nitrate concentration–discharge relationships in a semi‐arid watershed”

Tague goes back to her roots!

Professor Naomi Tague is back where it all began – where she got her undergraduate engineering degree at the University of Waterloo – today to present “Animating green stuff in hydrologic models: where we are and what is next” as part of the Water Institute‘s WaterTalks lecture series.

New publication on Urban Vegetation impact from Drought

This study looks at the response and potential impacts of drought on urban vegetation, and the ecosystem services it provides to cities – where >50% of the worlds populations resides. Miller, D.L., Alonzo, M., Roberts, D.A., Tague, C.L., McFadden, J.P. (2020) Drought response of urban trees and turfgrass using airborne imaging spectroscopy, Remote Sensing ofContinue reading “New publication on Urban Vegetation impact from Drought”

New Publication on implications of Active/Passive management on abandoned cropland

In this study, the RHESSys model is used to study the post response (including potential climate change scenarios) of hydrologic and vegetation dynamics to an Active Management strategy (i.e. shrub clearing as a result of natural revegetation) in an abandoned cropland catchment  of the Central Spanish Pyrenees. Khorchani, M., Nadal-Romero, E., Tague, C., Lasanta, T.,Continue reading “New Publication on implications of Active/Passive management on abandoned cropland”

New Publication looks at perspective on research directions in ecohydrology

In this new publication, the authors synthesis reveals an ecohydrology community that is increasingly interdisciplinary, engaged in society‐relevant problems, and that uses new technologies and modelling approaches to accomplish these goals. Tague, C.L., et. al. (2020) Adding our leaves: A community‐wide perspective on research directions in ecohydrology, Hydrological Processes doi.org/10.1002/hyp.13693

Louis Graup Lightning Talk

Tague Team Lab member and PhD student Louis Graup presented “Fire and Water: a Spatial Connection” as part of the 2020 UCSB Center for Spatial Studies Spatial Lightning Talks last week.  Bringing together speakers from across the UCSB campus and the local community, this annual series of 3-minute lightning talks is designed to enlighten participantsContinue reading “Louis Graup Lightning Talk”

Naomi Tague gives Moore Lecture

Earlier this month, Naomi Tague presented “Animating green stuff in Hydrologic models: Where we are and what is next” as part of the University of Virginia’s Environmental Sciences Department Moore lecture series hosted by Larry Band. Abstract: Early hydrologic models represented vegetation as a simple parameter that influenced interception and the transpiration of soil waterContinue reading “Naomi Tague gives Moore Lecture”

AGU 2019 Representation

At the Dec. 9-13, 2019 AGU conference – Tague Team Lab members along with extended lab friends/collaborators/colleagues, as well as the RHESSys user community were well represented through numerous presentations and posters (listed below). Naomi Tague – Ecohydrology and Eco-Informatics Linking theory and data to advance learning and discovery (Invited talk, Centennial – SWIRL, LightningContinue reading “AGU 2019 Representation”

New publications on modeling the effects of fire on vegetation

In this new publication in Ecological Modelling, the authors address the relationship between ecohydrology and wildfire and the representation of fire effects on vegetation carbon in ecohydrologic models, which requires a fully coupled modeling approach where wildfire and its effects co-evolve with ecohydrologic processes. Here they present the integration of a fire-effects model that is coupledContinue reading “New publications on modeling the effects of fire on vegetation”

Coupling fire spread with ecohydrology to simulate future fire regimes

Last week, Tague Team Lab friend and collaborator Maureen Kennedy (Assistant Professor, University of Washington, Tacoma) presented “Projecting future fire regimes and watershed dynamics requires coupling fire spread with ecohydrology” at the 8th International Fire Ecology and Management Congress in Tuscon, Arizona. Preliminary results were presented from the coupled WMFire fire spread/RHESSys Hydro-Ecological model used toContinue reading “Coupling fire spread with ecohydrology to simulate future fire regimes”

New Publication: does forest thinning enhance the activity & growth of remaining trees?

In this new publication, the authors conducted a large-scale thinning experiment in a semi-arid pine afforestation in the Yatir forest, located at the northern edge of the Negev desert, Israel. RHESSys was also used to upscale tree-scale measurements. Tsamir, M., Gottlieb, S., Preisler, Y., Rotenberg, E., Tatarinov, F., Yakir, D., Tague, C., Klein, T., StandContinue reading “New Publication: does forest thinning enhance the activity & growth of remaining trees?”

Ty Brandt PhD Dissertation Defense

Ty Brandt defends his dissertation entitled “Hydrology’s principal mysteries: the spatial distribution of snowfall” on July 30th, 2019.

New WRR Publication

In this new publication, authors Gabrielle Boisrame, Sally Thompson, Naomi Tague, and Scott Stephens use RHESSys to look at the hydrologic response of a restored fire regime in a basin within Yosemite National Park, California. Boisrame, G.F.S, Thompson, S.E., Tague C., Stephens, S.L. (2019) Restoring a Natural Fire Regime Alters the Water Balance of aContinue reading “New WRR Publication”

Tague presentation at Gordon Conference

Naomi Tague recently presented “Animating Green Stuff in Hydrologic Models: Where We Are and What Is Next?” at the Gordon Research Conference –  Catchment Science: Interactions of Hydrology, Biology and Geochemistry, Transcending the Uniqueness of Place in the Age of Big Data, June 23-28 at Proctor Academy in Andover, NH.

New Publication -investigating forest thinning and the influence of subsurface features on water use and regeneration

In this new publication in Frontiers, authors Naomi (Christina) Tague and Max Moritz highlight the importance of accounting for site-specific variation, such as soil water storage capacity, in assessing how fuel treatments may interact with ecosystem water use and drought vulnerability, and ultimately downslope impacts on streamflow. Tague, C.L., Moritz, M.A. (2019) Plant Accessible WaterContinue reading “New Publication -investigating forest thinning and the influence of subsurface features on water use and regeneration”

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