Naomi Tague was invited to lead a session at the International Symposium – BOUNDAR​Y SPANNING: Advances in Socio-Environmental Systems Research – put on by The ​National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF), Resources for the Future (RFF), and University of Maryland (UMD) this week in Annapolis, Maryland. Naomi brought together Tamma Carleton (UCBerkeley) “Valuing the global mortality consequences of climate change accounting for adaptation costs and benefits”, Adrian Das (US Geological Survey) “Tree Mortality and the California Drought: A preview of the future?”, Alex de Sherbinin (Columbia) “Migration as an adaptive response to climate change impacts and vulnerability”, Ariel Lugo (US Forest Service) “Who responds the quickest after hurricane wind stress: the social or the ecological systems?”, and Max Moritz (UC Santa Barbara) “When does fire, a natural ecological disturbance, become ‘stressful’?” in her session “Under Stress: For adaptive, evolving systems, how much stress is too much?”.