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Dr. Tague interviewed on AZoCleantech

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Naomi (Christina) Tague was interviewed on AZoCleantech by Alessandro Pirolini, editor of the AZoNetwork, regarding North American forest die-offs that have occurred in recent years. In the interview, Naomi discusses causes and prevention, and the research that grew out of the NCEAS working group and the recent publication that came from that research, “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate.”
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New Publication & Press Release

Dr. Tague, as a member of UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), collaborated on a new publication that will appear in New Phytologist this month (an early view of the publication is now available online), “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate”. The study examines the interactions between drought and insects, and their impact on forest health. Dr. Tague appears in a UCSB press release highlighting the study’s research.

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UCSB Press Release
NCEAS

Forest die-off Colo

The western U.S. has been a hotspot for forest die-offs such as this one in Colorado. Photo Credit: William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management

Figure 1. (a) Cumulative mortality rates (% basal area, BA) four major forest types (below) in western US forests averaged over 2000–2013, with fire-caused mortality removed from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (b) Annual mortality rates (% BA yr−1) of major tree species in the western US from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (c) Field-ascribed proximate cause of mortality that crews noted about individual dead trees in Juniperus osteosperma (JUOS), Pinus edulis (PIED), Pinus contorta (PICO), and Populus tremuloides (POTR) (Supporting Information Notes S1).

Figure 1. (a) Cumulative mortality rates (% basal area, BA) four major forest types (below) in western US forests averaged over 2000–2013, with fire-caused mortality removed from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (b) Annual mortality rates (% BA yr−1) of major tree species in the western US from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (c) Field-ascribed proximate cause of mortality that crews noted about individual dead trees in Juniperus osteosperma (JUOS), Pinus edulis (PIED), Pinus contorta (PICO), and Populus tremuloides (POTR) (Supporting Information Notes S1).

New Publication Accepted!

New publication accepted to Ecohydrology: Peng, H., Tague, C., and Jia, Y. Evaluating the eco-hydrological impacts of reforestation in the Loess Plateau, China using an eco-hydrological model. Access online
Dr. Tague collaborated with PhD student Hui Peng (Key Laboratory of Marine Environment and Ecology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China), using RHESSys to examine the eco-hydrologic responses to reforestation in two neighboring catchments in the Loess Plateau of China. Hui spent some time in the Tague Team Lab in 2012 as a visiting PhD student.

Simulated annual NPP/Biomass patterns for a) FC regrowth and b) FC mature and CC (FC - forested catchment; CC - control catchment)

Simulated annual NPP/Biomass patterns for a) FC regrowth and b) FC mature and CC
(FC – forested catchment; CC – control catchment)

Lab member featured in Bren news

PhD student Aubrey Dugger’s work is featured in the Spring 2014 edition of Bren News (a publication of the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management). Aubrey has worked with Dr. Tague for the past five years, adding new functionality to the RHESSys model for the complex modeling work she is conducting in the Santa Fe watershed, addressing optimal thinning practices to maximize water yield – and considering management under the impacts of climate change. RHESSys users will also benefit from Aubrey’s work, which capturs fine-scale processes and their aggregate effects, as it has been embedded in the model and can be used in future research.
Read the article (page 9)
Aubrey_at_desk

RHESSys used in a new publication

RHESSys was one of the models used in this new paper to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to meteorological data sets generated both with and without bias correction. The impact models include a macroscale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrological model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS).

What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?
Liu, M., Rajagopalan, K., Chung, S. H., Jiang, X., Harrison, J., Nergui, T., Guenther, A., Miller, C., Reyes, J., Tague, C., Choate, J., Salathé, E. P., Stöckle, C. O., and Adam, J. C.: , Biogeosciences, 11, 2601-2622, doi:10.5194/bg-11-2601-2014, 2014.
BiogeosciencesJournal

New Publication! RHESSys used for research in the Spanish Pyrenees

Dr. Tague worked with with researches at the Pyrenean Institute of Ecology using RHESSys in the first simulations of combined land cover and climate change in the hydrology of the Pyrenees and the management of a Pyrenean reservoir under future scenarios.
J.I. López-Moreno, J. Zabalza, S.M. Vicente-Serrano, J. Revuelto, M. Gilaberte, C. Azorin-Molina, E. Morán-Tejeda, J.M. García-Ruiz, C. Tague. 2013. Impact of climate and land use change on water availability and reservoir management: Scenarios in the Upper Aragón River, Spanish Pyrenees. Science of the Total Environment, S0048-9697(13)01069-3, doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.09.031
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