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Welcome to the Tague Team Lab at UCSB!

The Tague EcoHydrology lab focuses on watershed research, addressing the feedbacks among terrestrial vegetation, surface hydrological processes, and atmospheric conditions. We use a variety of techniques to examine the impact of changes in climate and land use on ecosystem health and water resources.
Please scroll through our blog below to see what we’ve been up to!

All are welcome to attend our weekly lab meetings and take part in presentations and scientific discussions. See our Lab meeting schedule & events page for information on each week’s topic or presenter. Meetings are held in the Bren hall lab wing, room 1005.

Re-thinking the paired watershed approach from the bottom up

In the new comment “Water sustainability and watershed storage – a comment” published in Nature Sustainability, the authors suggest re-thinking the traditional forest water sustainability question to include how watershed storage and forest access to that storage influence the water cycle.

McDonnell, J.J., Evaristo, J., Bladon, K.D., Buttle, J., Creed, I.F., Dymond, S.F., Grant, G., Iroume, A., Jackson, C.R., Jones, J.A., Maness, T., McGuire, K.J., Scott, D.F., Segura, C., Sidle, R.C., Tague, C. (2018) Comment: Water sustainability and watershed storage, Nature Sustainability 1(8): 378-379. doi: 10.1038/s41893-018-0099-8

The news is spreading!

The essay “Wildfires are inevitable – increasing home losses, fatalities and costs are not” by Max Moritz, Naomi Tague, and Sarah Anderson published earlier this month in The Conversation has been picked up and widely distributed by a number of other publications as well:

Scientific American
Heavy.com
Sun Journal
Science Alert
Homeland Security Newswire
Phys.org
KHSU Diverse Public Radio
Fort Bend Herald
KQED
Gazette Star
Morning Star
Red Roads
The H8
OPS15
Parallel State
Beaumont Enterprise
Greenwich Times
LA Times
PreventionWeb
TD Ameritrade
Science News Site
MarketWatch
Chicago Tribune
Humanitarian News
NEDRIX
Fairfield Citizen

How much stress is to much?

Naomi Tague was invited to lead a session at the International Symposium – BOUNDAR​Y SPANNING: Advances in Socio-Environmental Systems Research – put on by The ​National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF), Resources for the Future (RFF), and University of Maryland (UMD) this week in Annapolis, Maryland. Naomi brought together Tamma Carleton (UCBerkeley) “Valuing the global mortality consequences of climate change accounting for adaptation costs and benefits”, Adrian Das (US Geological Survey) “Tree Mortality and the California Drought: A preview of the future?”, Alex de Sherbinin (Columbia) “Migration as an adaptive response to climate change impacts and vulnerability”, Ariel Lugo (US Forest Service) “Who responds the quickest after hurricane wind stress: the social or the ecological systems?”, and Max Moritz (UC Santa Barbara) “When does fire, a natural ecological disturbance, become ‘stressful’?” in her session “Under Stress: For adaptive, evolving systems, how much stress is too much?”.

Erin Hanan accepts new faculty position!

Please join us in congratulating former PhD student/post doc Erin Hanan on her new faculty position as Assistant Professor of Fire Ecology in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Nevada, Reno.
Dr. Erin Hanan has been a valuable member of the Tague Team Lab and has made important contributions to research and RHESSys model functionality while she has been at UCSB. We wish her success in this new venture and look forward to future collaborations.

Dr. Elizabeth Garcia presentation

Former Tague PhD student Dr. Elizabeth Garcia, now a Water Resources Hydrologist at Seattle Public Utilities, returned last week to present “Water Management at Seattle Public Utilities” in Dr. Tague’s Climate change impacts and adaptation class.

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