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New publication “Before the Storm”

Given changing climate regimes and intensification of human modifications of the landscape, this new publication addresses the need for a better understanding of the influence of antecedent conditions on watershed function in the context of extreme climate events that disproportionately impact highly populated regions.

McMillan, S.K., Wilson, H.F., Tague, C.L., Hanes, D.M., Inamdar, S., Karwan, D.L., Loecke, T., Morrison, J., Murphy, S.F., Vidon, P. (2018) Before the storm: antecedent conditions as regulators of hydrologic and biogeochemical response to extreme climate events, Biogeochemistry doi:10.1007/s10533-018-0482-6

Tague Medpine presentation

Last week, Naomi Tague presented “Interacting ecophysiologic and hydroclimatic controls on post thinning forest water use and carbon sequestration”, authored with Klein Tamir, at the 6th International Medpine Conference held at The Hebrew University in Rehovot, Israel. The MedPine 6 focus – Mediterranean Forest Ecosystems: Forestry, Ecology, Conservation, and Human use – brought together scientists who study various aspects of Mediterranean forests and their ecosystems, conservation managers and foresters, in order to enhance interdisciplinary scientific and practical dialog

Re-thinking the paired watershed approach from the bottom up

In the new comment “Water sustainability and watershed storage – a comment” published in Nature Sustainability, the authors suggest re-thinking the traditional forest water sustainability question to include how watershed storage and forest access to that storage influence the water cycle.

McDonnell, J.J., Evaristo, J., Bladon, K.D., Buttle, J., Creed, I.F., Dymond, S.F., Grant, G., Iroume, A., Jackson, C.R., Jones, J.A., Maness, T., McGuire, K.J., Scott, D.F., Segura, C., Sidle, R.C., Tague, C. (2018) Comment: Water sustainability and watershed storage, Nature Sustainability 1(8): 378-379. doi: 10.1038/s41893-018-0099-8

The news is spreading!

The essay “Wildfires are inevitable – increasing home losses, fatalities and costs are not” by Max Moritz, Naomi Tague, and Sarah Anderson published earlier this month in The Conversation has been picked up and widely distributed by a number of other publications as well:

Scientific American
Heavy.com
Sun Journal
Science Alert
Homeland Security Newswire
Phys.org
KHSU Diverse Public Radio
Fort Bend Herald
KQED
Gazette Star
Morning Star
Red Roads
The H8
OPS15
Parallel State
Beaumont Enterprise
Greenwich Times
LA Times
PreventionWeb
TD Ameritrade
Science News Site
MarketWatch
Chicago Tribune
Humanitarian News
NEDRIX
Fairfield Citizen

How much stress is to much?

Naomi Tague was invited to lead a session at the International Symposium – BOUNDAR​Y SPANNING: Advances in Socio-Environmental Systems Research – put on by The ​National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF), Resources for the Future (RFF), and University of Maryland (UMD) this week in Annapolis, Maryland. Naomi brought together Tamma Carleton (UCBerkeley) “Valuing the global mortality consequences of climate change accounting for adaptation costs and benefits”, Adrian Das (US Geological Survey) “Tree Mortality and the California Drought: A preview of the future?”, Alex de Sherbinin (Columbia) “Migration as an adaptive response to climate change impacts and vulnerability”, Ariel Lugo (US Forest Service) “Who responds the quickest after hurricane wind stress: the social or the ecological systems?”, and Max Moritz (UC Santa Barbara) “When does fire, a natural ecological disturbance, become ‘stressful’?” in her session “Under Stress: For adaptive, evolving systems, how much stress is too much?”.